Saturday, September 23, 2017

Dead to Begin With By Bill Crider: Review/Giveaway

Dead to Begin With By Bill Crider: Review/Giveaway | Kings River Life Magazine: We are excited this week to have a review of the latest mystery by Bill Crider, and an interesting interview with Bill. Details at the end of this post on how to enter to win a copy of Dead to Begin With. We also have a link to order it from Amazon, and from an indie bookstore where a portion goes to help support KRL.

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

The best 'bad' episodes of 'Star Trek'

Song of the Day

How Bullwinkle Taught Kids Sophisticated Political Satire

How Bullwinkle Taught Kids Sophisticated Political Satire: “Mr. Chairman, I am against all foreign aid, especially to places like Hawaii and Alaska,” says Senator Fussmussen from the floor of a cartoon Senate in 1962. In the visitors’ gallery, Russian agents Boris Badenov and Natasha Fatale are deciding whether to use their secret “Goof Gas” gun to turn the Congress stupid, as they did to all the rocket scientists and professors in the last episode of “Bullwinkle.”

Today's Vintage Ad


I Miss the Old Days

American Actresses Who Defined the Hollywood's Golden Age in the 1940s: The 1930s and 1940s that marked by the Great Depression and leading into World War II is remembered as Hollywood's Golden Age.

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Russell Higgins, Bad Woman, Quarter Books, 1950

As Well They Should Have

Children Used to Learn About Death and Damnation With Their ABCs: In 19th-century New England, the books that taught kids how to read had a Puritanical morbidity to them

10 Terrific Facts About Stephen King

10 Terrific Facts About Stephen King 

Forgotten Hits: September 23rd

Forgotten Hits: September 23rd: The Strawberry Alarm Clock perform America's All-Time Favorite Psychedelic Song "Incense And Peppermints" on American Bandstand.

C. S. Lewis' 1937 Review of The Hobbit

C. S. Lewis' 1937 Review of The Hobbit: “The publishers claim that The Hobbit, though very unlike Alice, resembles it in being the work of a professor at play. A more important truth is that both belong to a very small class of books which have nothing in common save that each admits us to a world of its own—a world that seems to have been going on long before we stumbled into it but which, once found by the right reader, becomes indispensable to him. Its place is with Alice, Flatland, Phantastes, The Wind in the Willows.

Friday, September 22, 2017

Late Frank Zappa back on tour as hologram

Late Frank Zappa back on tour as hologram

Song of the Day

Chain Restaurants That Changed America

Most Important Chain Restaurants That Changed America

Today's Vintage Ad


But I Did

Nicolas Cage Movies You Had No Idea Existed

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Gerald Foster, The Virgin and the Barfly, Quarter Books, 1950

5 Secrets You Learn When You're A Gun Consultant For Movies

5 Secrets You Learn When You're A Gun Consultant For Movies

I Miss the Old Days

18 Year-Old Boxer Cassius Clay (Later Muhammad Ali) Wins Olympic Boxing Gold at the Rome 1960 Olympics: These were the games where one of the all-time sporting greats took his first steps on the international stage. A young boxer called Cassius Clay came to Rome intent on winning a gold medal, and left having taken a huge step towards becoming one of the most iconic figures in the history of sport.

Forgotten Hits: September 22nd

Forgotten Hits: September 22nd: The Beatles appear on the cover of "Time Magazine" … as a drawing … under the tagline "The Beatles / Their New Incarnation".  It depicts The Fab Four in colorful outfits at a time that finds them in between their "Sgt. Pepper" and their "Magical Mystery Tour" projects.  

Includes a couple of surveys, some nice photos, and a few songs to play.

7 things to know on first day of fall

7 things to know on first day of fall

FFB: Daddy's Gone A-Hunting -- Robert Skinner

I enjoyed Robert Skinner's series about Wesley Farrell, and when I ran across Daddy's Gone A-Hunting the other day while moving some books around, I decided I'd read it again.  I'm glad I did, as it was just as enjoyable the second time around.

Wesley Farrell is a mixed-blood creole who lives in the white world of New Orleans in the 1930s but who's equally at home in the very separate and definitely not equal black world. Farrell is a man known for being able to handle things of a criminal nature, and he's prone to violence on occasion.  He's very good at it. He's asked by Carol Donovan, a black woman who owns a nightclub, to help her with a problem.  It seems that a man named Archie Badeaux is threatening her.  Donovan is beautiful, and Farrell can't resist helping out, even though he knows something is fishy about the whole deal. 

Meanwhile, Badeaux is after the money that Ernie LeDoux hid out from a bank heist.  Just out of prison, LeDoux can't find the money because the man he trusted to hold it for him has died.

Added to the mix is the fact that three prominent black businessmen have been murdered, and somehow a wheelchair-bound black criminal named Lincoln and a black banker are involved.  The police are trying to solve the murders, and since Badeaux works for Lincoln, Farrell gets pulled into the case.

And that's not all.  There are at least two more prominent plot threads working with the others.  A lot is going on.

Skinner is great at the '30s atmosphere, and the characters, especially Farrell,  are fascinating.  I wonder if in this day when "cultural appropriation" has become a catchphrase if a book like this by a white author could find a publisher.  The Farrell series came to an end after six books, which is a shame.  I'm going to reread another one soon, just for fun.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

First It Was the Thin Mints Melee

Two women cited after fight over biscuit making at Macon McDonald's

Shamus Award Winners 2017

Mystery Fanfare: Shamus Award Winners 2017

10 Gritty Crime Novels That Will Take You to the 1970s NYC of The Deuce

10 Gritty Crime Novels That Will Take You to the 1970s NYC of The Deuce

Song of the Day

Things I See in Alvin, Texas


Today's Vintage Ad


I Found a Penny in the Walmart Parking Lot Last Week

Researchers Find 98-Million-Year-Old Horned Vampire Ant Encased in Amber

Lillian Ross, R. I. P.

The New York Times: Lillian Ross, who became known as the consummate fly-on-the-wall reporter in more than six decades at The New Yorker, whether writing about Ernest Hemingway, Hollywood or a busload of Indiana high school seniors on a class trip to New York, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. She was 99.  

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

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Ross Sloane, Three Naked Souls, Quarter Books, 1949


“Three Lessons of Shimon Litvak” (by John Gastineau)

“Three Lessons of Shimon Litvak” (by John Gastineau) | SOMETHING IS GOING TO HAPPEN: When EQMM’s November/December 2017 issue goes on sale next month, readers will be introduced to a new writer, John Gastineau. With his debut in our Department of First Stories, the former newspaper reporter, photographer, and book editor returns to his first love, writing, after many years as a full-time lawyer. It’s clear from the following post that he has long had an interest in crime fiction (and particularly spy fiction), and his analysis of some of the work of John le Carr is timely, with le Carr’s latest book, A Legacy of Spies, currently number three on the New York Times bestseller list. Readers who have not yet read the 1983 novel The Little Drummer Girl by John le Carr may want to do so before reading this post, which discusses the book in detail.—Janet Hutchings

I Miss the Old Days

Leggings: The Huge Fashion Trend of Women in the 1980s 

Gator Update

Alligators Attack and Eat Sharks, Study Confirms